La Cygne council accepts bid on sewer project

Updated: Apr 9

LA CYGNE – The La Cygne City Council gave another green light to the city’s sewer project when it accepted a $3.93 million bid for construction from Nowak Construction Inc. on Wednesday, March 16.


The bid was about $260,000 less than the project estimate by BG Consultants, the city’s consulting engineering firm. Two other companies bid on the project, with Tri-Star Utilities Inc. bid coming in at more than $4.3 million and Municipal Pipe & Tool tendering a $5.1 million bid.


Paul Owings, BG Consultants’ project manager, told the council that Nowak Construction had been vetted and that his company had worked with the company on a job in Baldwin City with good results.

He said the next steps in the process would be reviewing and signing the contract with the company, which must also secure a bond and insurance on the job. Owings said it would take about a month for the paperwork to be completed before construction could begin.


The council also discussed a grant application to the First Option Bank Trustee Foundation to build a new fire station. City Clerk Jodi Wade told the council that she had responded to questions asked by the foundation’s evaluating committee.


If the grant application is successful, the city now plans to allocate $100,000 of the nearly $171,000 of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds it received toward the fire station. If the grant application is not successful, the entire $171,000 will go to the fire station project.


The council discussed whether the $71,000 could be spent on the La Cygne Community Center refurbishing if the First Option Bank grant was received. Wade said that a complete remodeling of the community center could trigger the requirement that a sprinkler system be installed and that any work would need to ensure that the facility and restrooms were compliant with American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements.


While several council members discussed the fact that the community center does not bring much income into city coffers through rentals by the community – particularly with recent addition of a meeting space to the library – they still saw the value in keeping it for the community. Councilman Jerome Mitzner suggested that the building could still serve as a gathering place or a warming center during an emergency.


The council also retired into a closed-door session with City Attorney Burton Harding to discuss how the city could provide water to a residence outside of the city limits. The owner of the property, Judith Patterson, requested on March 2 that the city provide service to her home on East 1250 Road, about three-quarters of a mile from existing city water lines.


The council decided to send Patterson a letter outlining the options for providing her service, but council members declined to discuss the specifics of the letter except to indicate they were not refusing to provide her service. Mitzner said that not releasing the information was done to protect Patterson’s privacy.


The council also:

  • Discussed a lease agreement for a storage building at 307 Swan Street owned by Lincoln Township. Public Works Supervisor Dan Nasalroad said the township board had concerns about the maintenance of the building, but council members said the township board could accept the city’s terms or simply not sign the contract.

  • Heard a report from Nasalroad that both water pumps in the river went down the previous week. Nasalroad said that Mike Page was called out to work on the pumps. The city had one replacement pump, but the other is being repaired.

  • Voted to close the trash compactor on Easter, April 17.

  • Voted to approve a quote from Truly Insurance for nearly $64,400 for the city’s annual insurance policy. The council also directed Wade to research options for insurance.

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